About my Anosmia.

Ok, on a blog about living with Asperger syndrome I do a post that’s nothing to do with Asperger’s! I’ve been getting a few questions about this and how it affects me so I’ll do my best to answer them below.

Q. What is Anosmia?
A. Anosmia is the medical term for loss of the sense of smell. It can be caused by many things such as head trauma or infection, Nasal polyps, exposure to toxic chemicals, drug abuse or medication side effects (to name but a few) . For some people, like me, it’s a congenital condition meaning we were born this way. I’ve never known what a smell is; I will never know what a smell is. My brain just isn’t wired to receive this information.

Q. So if you can’t smell, you can’t taste right?
A. Wrong. I *CAN* taste. “Flavour” is a combination of both taste and smell (and affected by other senses too such as sight, mouth feel etc) The human tongue detects 5 basic flavour groups, Namely Salt, Sweet, Sour, Bitter and Unami (the strange “savoury” or “brothy” taste found in foods like Beef, Mushrooms and Soy). I can also detect the burning sensation (an actual physical pain response) from the capsaicin in chili, and the cooling sensation of menthol in mints. What I *CANNOT* get is the aromatics found in food. These travel both up the front of the nose, and up the back and give an extra level of information about the food you’re eating. This is why I don’t really drink. Wine all tastes the same to me. Beer all tastes bitter. I can’t differentiate between herbs in dishes and subtle nuances are totally lost on me. It’s all about the primary flavour and the mouthfeel to me. Explains why I ADORE salty potato crisps! (Chips if you’re an American 😉 )

Q. But it’s not serious though is it?
A. Yes AND No. I do not consider myself to be disabled. It’s not as limiting to my day-to-day life as deafness or blindness would be. It doesn’t degrade my quality of life significantly and on a day to day basis I rarely think about its absence. However, that said I have had issues in the past. I’ve had more than my fair share of food poisoning. I’ve eaten foods that have gone off because they LOOKED ok. I’ve set fire to my kitchen at least twice because I couldn’t smell the food I was cooking was burning. Finally, I’ve NARROWLY avoided killing myself because I walked into a kitchen and was about to turn on a light.. not realising a recently fitted gas appliance had been leaking all day! Luckily I was with someone with a good sense of smell who stopped me before… well. Also, among people who have lost their sense of smell, the sense of deprivation has been linked to severe depression and even suicidal thoughts. Luckily I don’t miss it as I’ve never had it.

Q. Wow! I hadn’t really thought about that! So any positives about anosmia?
A. Well, as positive as one can be about missing one of your five senses. I used to work on my Aunt’s farm at weekends as a child for pocket-money. I do not need to go into any great detail about why having no olfactory sense would be a benefit there 😉 It’s also fairly invisible. Unless I tell someone, no one knows. So I don’t have to suffer discrimination (positive or negative) over my condition.

Q. So how else has Anosmia affected your life?
A. For a while I was obsessed with being clean. I mean overly obsessed. As I didn’t know if I smelt fresh or not I would constantly wash myself. This developed into an OCD fixation with hand washing to the point where my hands were dry, cracked and bleeding. I’m “better” now. I manage my condition much more effectively than I did. I still don’t like being “dirty” but I can tolerate it. I can do things now I couldn’t do previously. Like getting my hands messy with dough making bread for my Wife and I. (Apparently I bake the better bread of the two of us.. so this is my task now XD ) I do not know if my Anosmia and Asperger Syndrome are linked. It’s likely. I’ve always felt “detached” from reality, like I’m living inside a plastic bubble. I cannot really connect with anything as I’m missing out on a layer of information I cannot perceive. Food is mostly boring for me. I forget to eat mainly because I’m not being prompted by external signals. I do like some foods over others but mostly I eat because I have to not because I want to.

I also don’t use deodorants or scented soaps. I wash with plain white unscented shower lotion and do not use any sprays or perfumes.

This is just a brief introduction to anosmia for those who didn’t already know anything about it. If you are interested in hearing more please feel free to contact me.

0 Replies to “About my Anosmia.”

  1. Interesting post. I’ve also recently just posted about my anosmia and it seems we have similar experiences. Texture in food is also very important, and I think that’s a common theme amongst people with anosmia.

    1. Thank you Tom, I’ll have to check out your post. So are you a congenital as well or did you develop anosmia in later life?

        1. Yeah I can imagine, the sense of loss must be terrible at times? As a congenital I have no concept of smell. I know it exists but it’s an alien sci-fi concept to me.. “Wait? you’re telling me your nose can perform chemical analysis of molecules in the air? get outta here!!” hehe

          it’s as alien to me as teleportation or x-ray vision !

          I don’t know if it’s a function of the Asperger’s or the Anosmia.. but my hearing is REALLY sensitive. Overly so I would say. In a previous blog post I mentioned about spooking a nurse when I was hearing the test calibration tones of a hearing test 😀 It’s my own “super power” which is really funny considering I’m married to a professional aromatherapist (with super acute sense of smell) who suffers from mild hearing loss. We complement each other so very well !

          Glad you found my post interesting. I’m enjoying reading your blog entries too.

          Pete.

          1. I don’t really miss it to be honest. Very rarely think about it. My hearing is also unusually good. But I’m not sure that’s a result of anosmia or just good to start with… interesting. I’ll have a read through your other posts 🙂

    2. Thank you Tom, I’ll have to check out your post. So are you a congenital as well or did you develop anosmia in later life?

        1. Yeah I can imagine, the sense of loss must be terrible at times? As a congenital I have no concept of smell. I know it exists but it’s an alien sci-fi concept to me.. “Wait? you’re telling me your nose can perform chemical analysis of molecules in the air? get outta here!!” hehe

          it’s as alien to me as teleportation or x-ray vision !

          I don’t know if it’s a function of the Asperger’s or the Anosmia.. but my hearing is REALLY sensitive. Overly so I would say. In a previous blog post I mentioned about spooking a nurse when I was hearing the test calibration tones of a hearing test 😀 It’s my own “super power” which is really funny considering I’m married to a professional aromatherapist (with super acute sense of smell) who suffers from mild hearing loss. We complement each other so very well !

          Glad you found my post interesting. I’m enjoying reading your blog entries too.

          Pete.

          1. I don’t really miss it to be honest. Very rarely think about it. My hearing is also unusually good. But I’m not sure that’s a result of anosmia or just good to start with… interesting. I’ll have a read through your other posts 🙂

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